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A “Chink In The Armor” For BCPD Officers Charged With Killing Prisoner: Cop’s Account May Solidify State Case In Freddie Gray Death

 

On the day family and friends buried one of Sandtowne-Winchester’s own native sons,  Freddie Gray, violence and rioting erupted across Baltimore City. Historians labeled such an uprising as “the lid finally popping off of a social and political fire storm within one of Baltimore’s most disenfranchised communities that had been simmering for generations.” In the wake of burned buildings and looted businesses, an urgent cry for justice emerged within the black community across our nation. The ongoing scrutiny of purported police brutality, violence, and the killing of unarmed black men in America, seem to provide the perfect backdrop for further advocacy, protest, and public unrest in a place like Baltimore that historically has been neglected by politicians, community leaders, and while suffering from aggressive tactics targeting blacks by city police.

In the glare of unprecedented media coverage since the “1968 riots” that erupted in Baltimore after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, all of Baltimore’s social disparities played out on a national stage. Followers of the Freddie Gray story became dismayed over the level of destruction that citizens of the city displayed, and in some incidents on live television. A very gloom depiction of Baltimore seem to rise above the smoke clouds and mass demonstrations that transpired, not only in Gray’s community, but across the entire city, all while a pervasive, but lingering unanswered question of exactly how, and why Freddie Gray died in the custody of Baltimore police permeated throughout the country.

Until now, there were no details made public related to the justification for criminal charges by the state against six city officers charged with Gray’s death. In a recent article published in the Baltimore Sun police officials reveal exclusively to a reporter, that statements made by officer William Porter during the investigation process conducted by Baltimore police brass surrounding the death of Freddie Gray, indicate that Gray had repeatedly made pleas for medical help. Although the police source doesn’t reveal Porter’s actual incident report he submitted pertaining to the case, it suggest that Officer Goodson and Porter specifically had a discussion about Gray’s physical condition near Druid Hill and Dolphin street (just blocks away from Central Booking), an admission most likely destroying any claim that the officers could potentially have made to suggest they were unaware of Gray’s physical injuries.

Assuming that Freddie Gray wasn’t the very first prisoner that Officer Caesar Goodson ever transported, he must have been aware of the policy in place at Booking, requiring any injured prisoner arriving at that facility to be cleared medically, before processing into their lockup. Goodson had to have encountered such a instance in the past, if he drove transport vehicles for Baltimore police prior to this incident. Officer Porter seemingly having to remind Goodson of Booking policy, suggest an unwillingness on the transport driver’s part to get Gray medical help. The Sun article also highlights that Porter admitted that he was unsure whether Gray was actually injured, or was putting on an act to delay a trip to a police lockup at Central Booking. These are very compelling details related to this case that have been leaked to the news media, and goes a long way to support prosecutor’s belief that Baltimore officers committed misconduct while in office, by not rendering aid to Gray, or at least calling for an EMS unit.

Porter’s purported communication to investigators creates a tremendous task for the defense of these officers to refute, repel, and justify there being no responsibility on their part regarding what happened to Freddie Gray. Initially it was believed that officers were concerned that Gray was faking his injuries, but now the indication that a police officer involved in the case has stated on the record, there was concern for Gray’s physical condition prior to him subsequently being found unresponsive, unconscious, and in apparent cardiac arrest by paramedics later on the morning of his arrest, may be all the ammunition the state needs to prove a volume of the charges against some of the officers. The idea that officers primarily focused their concern on whether Gray was just trying to delay being locked up, has to be completely dismissed, especially with the realization that he went into cardiac arrest, never regained consciousness after coming out of that paddy wagon, and ultimately died from a severe spinal cord injury a week later. That debate for the most part is over, and cops can’t use a faking prisoner argument anymore. The man died, which pretty much concludes that he was in fact injured, regardless of how he may have sustained his injuries.

More importantly, the mental image of these officers engaged in dialogue while a man is actually inside the paddy wagon in complete distress, probably won’t settle very well with a Baltimore jury, which are notoriously critical and suspicious of city police. The two cops may have a very small window to crawl out from under the scrutiny pertaining to their failure to get Gray help. Charging documents outline that while Goodson and Porter were at the Druid Hill/Dolphin location, a call for assistance (signal 13) in an unrelated arrest at Penn/North, may have took precedence over calling an EMS for Gray at that time. A signal 13 is perhaps the most alarming call a Baltimore police officer could receive during the course of their tour of duty. Such a call typically indicates that an officer is in trouble, and needs back up right away. Most Baltimore police officers are fanatical about responding to such an alert from police dispatch. This doesn’t create an excuse for the officers’ failure to get Gray help, but it could explain why his pleas for medical help were ignored.

Even giving considerable weight to my perspective regarding failure to get help for a prisoner, Goodson bares a tremendous degree of responsibility for the obvious reasons. Its standard for the transport driver to be on hand when a prisoner is being placed in the back of a vehicle they are responsible for operating, if for no other purpose but to conduct the standard pat-down search, and make certain the wagon is secure. Goodson assumed liability of Gray upon allowing the arresting officers to place a man who visibly appeared injured inside the wagon. Baltimore police veterans advising TPC state that Goodson was only asking for trouble when he pulled off with Gray inside, after personally viewing Gray’s cries for help prior to being placed inside the transport vehicle. Porter could always make the argument that he wasn’t the wagon driver, and that he was responding to a police alert involving the imminent safety of another Baltimore cop, to justify why he didn’t radio for an EMS. Goodson has no logical premise what so ever for denying Gray access to medical care.

The only reasonable explanation that could be offered by officer Caesar Goodson that would trump scrutiny over failing to provide assistance to Freddie Gray, would be if he received a direct order from a superior officer, who specifically ordered him not to radio for and EMS to aid Gray. Its doubtful any supervisor would ever make such an admission considering the magnitude of such direction, but even if that were the case, there would still have to be an extremely valid reason not to assist a prisoner in police custody who requested medical help. Goodson radioed for assistance with his prisoner at Druid Hill and Dolphin, so its unsettling that he didn’t follow up by radioing for an EMS upon the discovery that Gray was requesting medical care. Also, his failure to report a stop at Freemont and Mosher streets, where he parked the transport vehicle, went into the back to supposedly check on Gray, and failed to report those details to investigators is very troubling. In fact, Goodson’ actions demonstrates a reckless disregard for police procedure and the personal safety of his prisoner.

Its not unusual for a Baltimore police transport vehicle to make multiple stops, picking up a volume of prisoners before heading to the lockup at Central Booking, but it does appear strange that there were multiple stops made (three to be exact) prior to the transport vehicle responding to Penn-North (4th stop) to load another prisoner. Stops and timeline indicated below:

Freddie Gray Arrest Timeline

  1. 8:39:12 a.m.

    Initial ContactLt. Brian W. Rice and Officers Edward M. Nero and Garrett E. Miller were on bike patrol near the corner of North Avenue and Mount Street. Lieutenant Rice made eye contact with Mr. Gray, who ran away.

  2. 8:39:52 a.m.

    “I Got Him”Mr. Gray surrendered to Officers Miller and Nero in the 1700 block of Presbury Street. “I got him,” one officer stated, according to Jerry Rodriguez, the Police Department’s deputy commisioner.

  3. 8:40 a.m.

    Inhaler RequestedMs. Mosby said the officers handcuffed Mr. Gray and placed him face down. Mr. Gray said he could not breathe and requested an inhaler, but does not receive one, Ms. Mosby said.

    Illegal Arrest AllegedOfficers Miller and Nero put Mr. Gray in a seated position and find a folding knife, which Ms. Mosby said was legal under Maryland law. The officers charged Mr. Gray with illegal possession of a switchblade. The officers then placed Mr. Gray down on his stomach and restrained him until the police van arrived. Ms. Mosby said Lieutenant Rice and Officers Miller and Nero “failed to establish probable cause for Mr. Gray’s arrest as no crime had been committed.”
     
    No Seatbelt UsedThe police van arrived. The officers put Mr. Gray into the van but did not secure him with a seatbelt, as required by department regulations, Ms. Mosby said.

     

  4.  8:46 a.m.

    Stop No. 1Ms. Mosby said Lieutenant Rice directed the van driver, Officer Caesar R. Goodson Jr., to stop. She said Officers Miller and Nero and Lieutenant Rice removed Mr. Gray from the van and placed him in leg restraints. Mr. Gray was loaded head first onto the floor of the van, Ms. Mosby said.

  5.  Between 8:54 and 8:59 a.m.

    Critical Neck InjuryLieutenant Rice directed Officer Goodson to take Mr. Gray to Baltimore’s Central Booking and Intake Center, Ms. Mosby said. “Following transport from Baker Street, Mr. Gray suffered a severe and critical neck injury as a result of being handcuffed, shackled by his feet and unrestrained inside the B.P.D. wagon,” she said.

    Stop No. 2Officer Goodson stopped the van at Fremont Avenue and Mosher Street and went back to observe Mr. Gray. “Despite stopping for the purpose of checking on Mr. Gray’s condition, at no point did he seek nor did he render any medical assistance for Mr. Gray,” Ms. Mosby said. With Mr. Gray still unsecured by a seatbelt, Officer Goodson returned to the driver’s seat and continued on to Central Booking, Ms. Mosby said.

  6.  8:59 a.m.

    Stop No. 3A few blocks later, Ms. Mosby said, Officer Goodson called dispatch for help checking on his prisoner. Officer William G. Porter arrived and he and Officer Goodson went to the back of the van. “Mr. Gray at that time requested help and indicated that he could not breathe,” Ms. Mosby said. She said Mr. Gray “indicated at least twice that he was in need of a medic.” Officer Porter helped Mr. Gray from the floor of the van to the bench, she said, but neither officer belted him in nor requested or rendered medical assistance.

    Picking Up Another PersonA call went out for a van to pick up and transport another person who had been arrested. “Despite Mr. Gray’s obvious and recognized need for assistance,” Ms. Mosby said, “Officer Goodson, in a grossly negligent manner, chose to respond.”

    Stop No. 4Ms. Mosby said Officer Goodson was met here by Officers Nero, Miller and Porter. Sgt. Alicia D. White and Officers Porter and Goodson observed “Mr. Gray unresponsive on the floor,” Ms. Mosby said. Sergeant White spoke to the back of Mr. Gray’s head, and he did not respond. “Despite Mr. Gray’s seriously deteriorating medical condition, no medical assistance was rendered or summoned for Mr. Gray at that time by any officer,” Ms. Mosby said. The additional prisoner was loaded into the van on the opposite side. For the fifth time, according to Ms. Mosby, Officer Goodson failed to restrain Mr. Gray with a seatbelt.

  7.  9:24 a.m.

    Arrival at Police StationWhen the van arrived at the Western District police station, Ms. Mosby said, Mr. Gray was not breathing. A medic was called and Mr. Gray was rushed to the University of Maryland’s Shock Trauma Center, where he died a week later.

Additionally, before the prisoner who was loaded in the police wagon at Penn-North came forward to personally dispute claims that Baltimore police officials had stated publicly, that the second prisoner overheard Gray thrashing about on the other side of the wagon, in what sounded like an attempt to intentionally harm himself. In the above timeline, indicated with the green underlined text, police investigators concluded that Gray was unconscious and unresponsive at the time the second prisoner was loaded. Since Gray was determined to be in cardiac arrest by a paramedic a very short time later, it just further discredits the absurd claim that police supporters continue to theorize regarding Gray potentially attempting to harm himself. The source of the self inflicted injury claim appears to have originated from fabrication, as the established facts doesn’t support such an assertion by police officials.

Upon officers Goodson and Porter arriving at Penn-North, where they met Lieutenant Rice, officers Nero, Miller, and Sergeant Alicia White, Gray was further observed in the back of the wagon, and despite his apparent rapidly deteriorating medical condition, no one called for medical assistance while Gray was transported to the Western District police station. In the aftermath of these strange and unexplained bizarre sequence of events that transpired after Gray was taken into custody, exactly what happened may never be fully explained. What is crystal clear though, is that a video out there captured Freddie Gray in apparent distress at the time he was physically taken into custody, and despite what rationalizations anyone may offer surrounding what happened, he was never seen conscious outside of the police wagon ever again.

Some may argue that while these officers failed to do their jobs in many respects pertaining to securing the personal safety of Freddie Gray, they’re convinced that the actions of these Baltimore police officers doesn’t reach the heights of serious felony charges against them. However, close observers of this case think that officer William Porter is not only the “chink in the armour” that exposes the accused rank and file, but he just may have provided additional details regarding the communications that transpired among the officers. I mean let’s face it, failure to get a prisoner help of not buckling him in the wagon properly won’t get a conviction for depraved heart, second degree murder. The manslaughter and negligent homicide by vehicle count may stick (and that’s a stretch), but there has to be more for the state to feel confident that the depraved murder two beef will stick.

In the end, those pundits who disagree with prosecutor Mosby are holding firm to the belief that the officers were only doing their jobs, and Freddie Gray was a co0nvicted heroin dealer who didn’t deserve sympathy, not even a trip to the emergency room. The actions of the cops who interacted with him that day, illustrate at the very least, Freddie Gray’s life didn’t matter. Their failure to protect him while in their custody, decries the culture of policing in Baltimore that many have long become exhausted. It doesn’t matter if Freddie Gray sold heroin for a billion years, he was a human being who didn’t deserve to die despite his sins. What happened to him was disgusting, despicable, and inhumane. Hopefully, as Porter’s truth about what happened that day brings about a resolute culmination to this horrible story, those who remain in Sandtowne-Winchester may claim a small victory for one of their own, who died trying to survive on a playing field that has always been unfair and uneven, since the day he was born.

The People’s Champion

I’m Crime Blogger David Adams

Sources:

The New York Times

The Baltimore Sun

Self proclaimed geek, Advocate for the homeless, Social Change, Crime Blogger, and mobile technology enthusiast. Recognized journalist and Human Interest Writer championing the plight of the masses whom are without a voice of their own.
email

David Adams

Self proclaimed geek, Advocate for the homeless, Social Change, Crime Blogger, and mobile technology enthusiast. Recognized journalist and Human Interest Writer championing the plight of the masses whom are without a voice of their own.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
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On the day family and friends buried one of Sandtowne-Winchester’s own native sons,  Freddie Gray, violence and rioting erupted across Baltimore City. Historians labeled such an uprising as “the lid finally popping off of a social and political fire storm within one of Baltimore’s most disenfranchised communities that had been simmering for generations.” In the wake of burned buildings and looted businesses, an urgent cry for justice emerged within the black community across our nation. The ongoing scrutiny of purported police brutality, violence, and the killing of unarmed black men in America, seem to provide the perfect backdrop for further advocacy, protest, and public unrest in a place like Baltimore that historically has been neglected by politicians, community leaders, and while suffering from aggressive tactics targeting blacks by city police.

In the glare of unprecedented media coverage since the “1968 riots” that erupted in Baltimore after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, all of Baltimore’s social disparities played out on a national stage. Followers of the Freddie Gray story became dismayed over the level of destruction that citizens of the city displayed, and in some incidents on live television. A very gloom depiction of Baltimore seem to rise above the smoke clouds and mass demonstrations that transpired, not only in Gray’s community, but across the entire city, all while a pervasive, but lingering unanswered question of exactly how, and why Freddie Gray died in the custody of Baltimore police permeated throughout the country.

Until now, there were no details made public related to the justification for criminal charges by the state against six city officers charged with Gray’s death. In a recent article published in the Baltimore Sun police officials reveal exclusively to a reporter, that statements made by officer William Porter during the investigation process conducted by Baltimore police brass surrounding the death of Freddie Gray, indicate that Gray had repeatedly made pleas for medical help. Although the police source doesn’t reveal Porter’s actual incident report he submitted pertaining to the case, it suggest that Officer Goodson and Porter specifically had a discussion about Gray’s physical condition near Druid Hill and Dolphin street (just blocks away from Central Booking), an admission most likely destroying any claim that the officers could potentially have made to suggest they were unaware of Gray’s physical injuries.

Assuming that Freddie Gray wasn’t the very first prisoner that Officer Caesar Goodson ever transported, he must have been aware of the policy in place at Booking, requiring any injured prisoner arriving at that facility to be cleared medically, before processing into their lockup. Goodson had to have encountered such a instance in the past, if he drove transport vehicles for Baltimore police prior to this incident. Officer Porter seemingly having to remind Goodson of Booking policy, suggest an unwillingness on the transport driver’s part to get Gray medical help. The Sun article also highlights that Porter admitted that he was unsure whether Gray was actually injured, or was putting on an act to delay a trip to a police lockup at Central Booking. These are very compelling details related to this case that have been leaked to the news media, and goes a long way to support prosecutor’s belief that Baltimore officers committed misconduct while in office, by not rendering aid to Gray, or at least calling for an EMS unit.

Porter’s purported communication to investigators creates a tremendous task for the defense of these officers to refute, repel, and justify there being no responsibility on their part regarding what happened to Freddie Gray. Initially it was believed that officers were concerned that Gray was faking his injuries, but now the indication that a police officer involved in the case has stated on the record, there was concern for Gray’s physical condition prior to him subsequently being found unresponsive, unconscious, and in apparent cardiac arrest by paramedics later on the morning of his arrest, may be all the ammunition the state needs to prove a volume of the charges against some of the officers. The idea that officers primarily focused their concern on whether Gray was just trying to delay being locked up, has to be completely dismissed, especially with the realization that he went into cardiac arrest, never regained consciousness after coming out of that paddy wagon, and ultimately died from a severe spinal cord injury a week later. That debate for the most part is over, and cops can’t use a faking prisoner argument anymore. The man died, which pretty much concludes that he was in fact injured, regardless of how he may have sustained his injuries.

More importantly, the mental image of these officers engaged in dialogue while a man is actually inside the paddy wagon in complete distress, probably won’t settle very well with a Baltimore jury, which are notoriously critical and suspicious of city police. The two cops may have a very small window to crawl out from under the scrutiny pertaining to their failure to get Gray help. Charging documents outline that while Goodson and Porter were at the Druid Hill/Dolphin location, a call for assistance (signal 13) in an unrelated arrest at Penn/North, may have took precedence over calling an EMS for Gray at that time. A signal 13 is perhaps the most alarming call a Baltimore police officer could receive during the course of their tour of duty. Such a call typically indicates that an officer is in trouble, and needs back up right away. Most Baltimore police officers are fanatical about responding to such an alert from police dispatch. This doesn’t create an excuse for the officers’ failure to get Gray help, but it could explain why his pleas for medical help were ignored.

Even giving considerable weight to my perspective regarding failure to get help for a prisoner, Goodson bares a tremendous degree of responsibility for the obvious reasons. Its standard for the transport driver to be on hand when a prisoner is being placed in the back of a vehicle they are responsible for operating, if for no other purpose but to conduct the standard pat-down search, and make certain the wagon is secure. Goodson assumed liability of Gray upon allowing the arresting officers to place a man who visibly appeared injured inside the wagon. Baltimore police veterans advising TPC state that Goodson was only asking for trouble when he pulled off with Gray inside, after personally viewing Gray’s cries for help prior to being placed inside the transport vehicle. Porter could always make the argument that he wasn’t the wagon driver, and that he was responding to a police alert involving the imminent safety of another Baltimore cop, to justify why he didn’t radio for an EMS. Goodson has no logical premise what so ever for denying Gray access to medical care.

The only reasonable explanation that could be offered by officer Caesar Goodson that would trump scrutiny over failing to provide assistance to Freddie Gray, would be if he received a direct order from a superior officer, who specifically ordered him not to radio for and EMS to aid Gray. Its doubtful any supervisor would ever make such an admission considering the magnitude of such direction, but even if that were the case, there would still have to be an extremely valid reason not to assist a prisoner in police custody who requested medical help. Goodson radioed for assistance with his prisoner at Druid Hill and Dolphin, so its unsettling that he didn’t follow up by radioing for an EMS upon the discovery that Gray was requesting medical care. Also, his failure to report a stop at Freemont and Mosher streets, where he parked the transport vehicle, went into the back to supposedly check on Gray, and failed to report those details to investigators is very troubling. In fact, Goodson’ actions demonstrates a reckless disregard for police procedure and the personal safety of his prisoner.

Its not unusual for a Baltimore police transport vehicle to make multiple stops, picking up a volume of prisoners before heading to the lockup at Central Booking, but it does appear strange that there were multiple stops made (three to be exact) prior to the transport vehicle responding to Penn-North (4th stop) to load another prisoner. Stops and timeline indicated below:

Freddie Gray Arrest Timeline

  1. 8:39:12 a.m.

    Initial ContactLt. Brian W. Rice and Officers Edward M. Nero and Garrett E. Miller were on bike patrol near the corner of North Avenue and Mount Street. Lieutenant Rice made eye contact with Mr. Gray, who ran away.

  2. 8:39:52 a.m.

    “I Got Him”Mr. Gray surrendered to Officers Miller and Nero in the 1700 block of Presbury Street. “I got him,” one officer stated, according to Jerry Rodriguez, the Police Department’s deputy commisioner.

  3. 8:40 a.m.

    Inhaler RequestedMs. Mosby said the officers handcuffed Mr. Gray and placed him face down. Mr. Gray said he could not breathe and requested an inhaler, but does not receive one, Ms. Mosby said.

    Illegal Arrest AllegedOfficers Miller and Nero put Mr. Gray in a seated position and find a folding knife, which Ms. Mosby said was legal under Maryland law. The officers charged Mr. Gray with illegal possession of a switchblade. The officers then placed Mr. Gray down on his stomach and restrained him until the police van arrived. Ms. Mosby said Lieutenant Rice and Officers Miller and Nero “failed to establish probable cause for Mr. Gray’s arrest as no crime had been committed.”
     
    No Seatbelt UsedThe police van arrived. The officers put Mr. Gray into the van but did not secure him with a seatbelt, as required by department regulations, Ms. Mosby said.

     

  4.  8:46 a.m.

    Stop No. 1Ms. Mosby said Lieutenant Rice directed the van driver, Officer Caesar R. Goodson Jr., to stop. She said Officers Miller and Nero and Lieutenant Rice removed Mr. Gray from the van and placed him in leg restraints. Mr. Gray was loaded head first onto the floor of the van, Ms. Mosby said.

  5.  Between 8:54 and 8:59 a.m.

    Critical Neck InjuryLieutenant Rice directed Officer Goodson to take Mr. Gray to Baltimore’s Central Booking and Intake Center, Ms. Mosby said. “Following transport from Baker Street, Mr. Gray suffered a severe and critical neck injury as a result of being handcuffed, shackled by his feet and unrestrained inside the B.P.D. wagon,” she said.

    Stop No. 2Officer Goodson stopped the van at Fremont Avenue and Mosher Street and went back to observe Mr. Gray. “Despite stopping for the purpose of checking on Mr. Gray’s condition, at no point did he seek nor did he render any medical assistance for Mr. Gray,” Ms. Mosby said. With Mr. Gray still unsecured by a seatbelt, Officer Goodson returned to the driver’s seat and continued on to Central Booking, Ms. Mosby said.

  6.  8:59 a.m.

    Stop No. 3A few blocks later, Ms. Mosby said, Officer Goodson called dispatch for help checking on his prisoner. Officer William G. Porter arrived and he and Officer Goodson went to the back of the van. “Mr. Gray at that time requested help and indicated that he could not breathe,” Ms. Mosby said. She said Mr. Gray “indicated at least twice that he was in need of a medic.” Officer Porter helped Mr. Gray from the floor of the van to the bench, she said, but neither officer belted him in nor requested or rendered medical assistance.

    Picking Up Another PersonA call went out for a van to pick up and transport another person who had been arrested. “Despite Mr. Gray’s obvious and recognized need for assistance,” Ms. Mosby said, “Officer Goodson, in a grossly negligent manner, chose to respond.”

    Stop No. 4Ms. Mosby said Officer Goodson was met here by Officers Nero, Miller and Porter. Sgt. Alicia D. White and Officers Porter and Goodson observed “Mr. Gray unresponsive on the floor,” Ms. Mosby said. Sergeant White spoke to the back of Mr. Gray’s head, and he did not respond. “Despite Mr. Gray’s seriously deteriorating medical condition, no medical assistance was rendered or summoned for Mr. Gray at that time by any officer,” Ms. Mosby said. The additional prisoner was loaded into the van on the opposite side. For the fifth time, according to Ms. Mosby, Officer Goodson failed to restrain Mr. Gray with a seatbelt.

  7.  9:24 a.m.

    Arrival at Police StationWhen the van arrived at the Western District police station, Ms. Mosby said, Mr. Gray was not breathing. A medic was called and Mr. Gray was rushed to the University of Maryland’s Shock Trauma Center, where he died a week later.

Additionally, before the prisoner who was loaded in the police wagon at Penn-North came forward to personally dispute claims that Baltimore police officials had stated publicly, that the second prisoner overheard Gray thrashing about on the other side of the wagon, in what sounded like an attempt to intentionally harm himself. In the above timeline, indicated with the green underlined text, police investigators concluded that Gray was unconscious and unresponsive at the time the second prisoner was loaded. Since Gray was determined to be in cardiac arrest by a paramedic a very short time later, it just further discredits the absurd claim that police supporters continue to theorize regarding Gray potentially attempting to harm himself. The source of the self inflicted injury claim appears to have originated from fabrication, as the established facts doesn’t support such an assertion by police officials.

Upon officers Goodson and Porter arriving at Penn-North, where they met Lieutenant Rice, officers Nero, Miller, and Sergeant Alicia White, Gray was further observed in the back of the wagon, and despite his apparent rapidly deteriorating medical condition, no one called for medical assistance while Gray was transported to the Western District police station. In the aftermath of these strange and unexplained bizarre sequence of events that transpired after Gray was taken into custody, exactly what happened may never be fully explained. What is crystal clear though, is that a video out there captured Freddie Gray in apparent distress at the time he was physically taken into custody, and despite what rationalizations anyone may offer surrounding what happened, he was never seen conscious outside of the police wagon ever again.

Some may argue that while these officers failed to do their jobs in many respects pertaining to securing the personal safety of Freddie Gray, they’re convinced that the actions of these Baltimore police officers doesn’t reach the heights of serious felony charges against them. However, close observers of this case think that officer William Porter is not only the “chink in the armour” that exposes the accused rank and file, but he just may have provided additional details regarding the communications that transpired among the officers. I mean let’s face it, failure to get a prisoner help of not buckling him in the wagon properly won’t get a conviction for depraved heart, second degree murder. The manslaughter and negligent homicide by vehicle count may stick (and that’s a stretch), but there has to be more for the state to feel confident that the depraved murder two beef will stick.

In the end, those pundits who disagree with prosecutor Mosby are holding firm to the belief that the officers were only doing their jobs, and Freddie Gray was a co0nvicted heroin dealer who didn’t deserve sympathy, not even a trip to the emergency room. The actions of the cops who interacted with him that day, illustrate at the very least, Freddie Gray’s life didn’t matter. Their failure to protect him while in their custody, decries the culture of policing in Baltimore that many have long become exhausted. It doesn’t matter if Freddie Gray sold heroin for a billion years, he was a human being who didn’t deserve to die despite his sins. What happened to him was disgusting, despicable, and inhumane. Hopefully, as Porter’s truth about what happened that day brings about a resolute culmination to this horrible story, those who remain in Sandtowne-Winchester may claim a small victory for one of their own, who died trying to survive on a playing field that has always been unfair and uneven, since the day he was born.

The People’s Champion

I’m Crime Blogger David Adams

Sources:

The New York Times

The Baltimore Sun

Self proclaimed geek, Advocate for the homeless, Social Change, Crime Blogger, and mobile technology enthusiast. Recognized journalist and Human Interest Writer championing the plight of the masses whom are without a voice of their own.
email

David Adams

Self proclaimed geek, Advocate for the homeless, Social Change, Crime Blogger, and mobile technology enthusiast. Recognized journalist and Human Interest Writer championing the plight of the masses whom are without a voice of their own.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInGoogle Plus

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