Young Black And Missing: An Anatomy Of Race Hate In America

We have seen the images on Billboards, fliers posted on street poles, and on milk cartons for decades in a campaign to reunite missing children with their love ones. Though the stories on many of these sad and horrific cases linger on, there isn’t a since of urgency to resolve cases where young kids simply disappear in thin air without a trace. Many grieving parents never obtain closure after losing a child and it must be a living cancer to simply move on without them. We see National Media Reports on most Major Television Networks all the time. Some of the more recent stories highlighted the tragedy of young Caylee Anthony, Baby Lisa and even Teen Natalie Halloway, but the troubling reality is that all of these children were White Americans. Rarely if ever do National Media Broadcast stories pertaining to missing Black Children. Upon the initial sounding of an alarm that a white child has gone missing Media, Police, and the F.B.I. are on the case. These incidents normally trigger large search parties into the dark of the night looking for missing white kids. When a Black child becomes missing, the Police downplays the entire situation and almost assuredly assumes that the child is troubled, ran away, or just hanging out. The lack of authentic concern or investigation during the initial report of a missing black child results in losing valuable and critical time. To highlight my argument here, during the initial report  of the Phylicia Barnes missing person case, the child’s mother Janice Sallis spoke with the primary Officer on the scene, who told her, “We believe that she ran away”. Ms. Sallis had to convey to the Officer that her child would never do that. That she was a happen kid, and had no reason to run off without letting family know. Ms. Sallis even had to beg Police to go and look for her daughter. Later on when it became apparent that foul play was involved in the Barnes kid case, the Police even cried out for National Media attention. Networks reluctantly ran her story only after race was introduce for the lack of coverage of a missing studious black kid. Currently the News media has been running the Baby Lisa missing person case night and day. The Media has been on that case from the gate, but at the same time a pretty little African American child Jahessye Shockley from Glendale, Arizona has been missing for nearly a month, and most Americans have never heard about her story.

Young 5 year old Jahessye Shockley went missing on October 11, 2011

In fact there are hundreds of black kids currently missing and many of these tragic stories have yet to break mainstream news. Many have argued that the life of a black child isn’t valued as equally as that of white children. Some say that media sells cases of missing persons based on cosmetology in an effort to make sales of advertisements they solicit to viewers. In short the perception is that beauty sells. This is a very disturbing revelation which in fact infers that white children are more physically appealing than black kids. But not just that, African American Publications such as Jet, Ebony, Essence,  and other periodicals that solicit to our communities have failed to deliver media coverage of missing black kids as well. To further illustrate this point, we also see the lack of interest in stories by Blacks in power, in Congress, the Senate, and other Black Officials holding Public office who fail to even associate themselves with the plight of Black families suffering in the wake of their missing children. Moreover, the most disheartening reality is the black community itself fosters a scary discernment whereby we devalue the life of our own kids. We are not outraged enough. We are not shouting at the top of our lungs demanding exposure or Police attentiveness in finding missing black kids. Time and time again we see large groups of volunteers within the white community, some times in the thousands, searching and looking for their kids. The Black community has failed itself on this issue and we have no one to blame but ourselves. We must began developing respect and admiration for our community, learned to love each other, and look after each others children. In cases where an actual crime has occurred related to missing children, individuals who know something, or has saw something must come forward. We continue to make excuses why we don’t get involved. However, I am not referring to the thug who robbed the local corner store, I am talking about our children, and there can’t possibly be anything of greater importance. When we see crime against our children the entire community must get involved and demonstrate that our kids are sacred ground and any harm unto them will not be tolerated. We must stop living in fear and began to do for our selves what is necessary to protect our children. We know that America is racist, that some people don’t love our people, hate our people, wish death upon our people, and our children. Fear must not be an option when protecting our kids. A movement began last night in an effort to develop a grass roots campaign to help find and locate missing Black Children. The distinguished Host of WBRG “The Bridge” on Blogtalk Radio, Mr. John Robinson and Ms. Corliss King challenged listeners to post images of missing black children on their Facebook Profile page. So starting this Monday or before, I am requesting that all of you (all 20,000 of you) who have been visiting my Blog related to the Phylicia Barnes case, to join in and assist us  launching this movement to get the images of missing black kids out there to the public. You never know what we can achieve by getting the pictures out there in Social Media. Please visit www.blackandmissinginc.com to learn more about missing Black kids. Also post the picture of a missing black child for at least a week and give a brief history of the child’s story. We must do what we certainly can and have to do for ourselves, and save our kids. God Bless each and everyone of you.

The People’s Champion

I’m David Adams

David Adams

Self proclaimed geek, Advocate for the homeless, Social Change, Crime Blogger, and mobile technology enthusiast. Recognized journalist and Human Interest Writer championing the plight of the masses whom are without a voice of their own.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInGoogle Plus

We have seen the images on Billboards, fliers posted on street poles, and on milk cartons for decades in a campaign to reunite missing children with their love ones. Though the stories on many of these sad and horrific cases linger on, there isn’t a since of urgency to resolve cases where young kids simply disappear in thin air without a trace. Many grieving parents never obtain closure after losing a child and it must be a living cancer to simply move on without them. We see National Media Reports on most Major Television Networks all the time. Some of the more recent stories highlighted the tragedy of young Caylee Anthony, Baby Lisa and even Teen Natalie Halloway, but the troubling reality is that all of these children were White Americans. Rarely if ever do National Media Broadcast stories pertaining to missing Black Children. Upon the initial sounding of an alarm that a white child has gone missing Media, Police, and the F.B.I. are on the case. These incidents normally trigger large search parties into the dark of the night looking for missing white kids. When a Black child becomes missing, the Police downplays the entire situation and almost assuredly assumes that the child is troubled, ran away, or just hanging out. The lack of authentic concern or investigation during the initial report of a missing black child results in losing valuable and critical time. To highlight my argument here, during the initial report  of the Phylicia Barnes missing person case, the child’s mother Janice Sallis spoke with the primary Officer on the scene, who told her, “We believe that she ran away”. Ms. Sallis had to convey to the Officer that her child would never do that. That she was a happen kid, and had no reason to run off without letting family know. Ms. Sallis even had to beg Police to go and look for her daughter. Later on when it became apparent that foul play was involved in the Barnes kid case, the Police even cried out for National Media attention. Networks reluctantly ran her story only after race was introduce for the lack of coverage of a missing studious black kid. Currently the News media has been running the Baby Lisa missing person case night and day. The Media has been on that case from the gate, but at the same time a pretty little African American child Jahessye Shockley from Glendale, Arizona has been missing for nearly a month, and most Americans have never heard about her story.

Young 5 year old Jahessye Shockley went missing on October 11, 2011

In fact there are hundreds of black kids currently missing and many of these tragic stories have yet to break mainstream news. Many have argued that the life of a black child isn’t valued as equally as that of white children. Some say that media sells cases of missing persons based on cosmetology in an effort to make sales of advertisements they solicit to viewers. In short the perception is that beauty sells. This is a very disturbing revelation which in fact infers that white children are more physically appealing than black kids. But not just that, African American Publications such as Jet, Ebony, Essence,  and other periodicals that solicit to our communities have failed to deliver media coverage of missing black kids as well. To further illustrate this point, we also see the lack of interest in stories by Blacks in power, in Congress, the Senate, and other Black Officials holding Public office who fail to even associate themselves with the plight of Black families suffering in the wake of their missing children. Moreover, the most disheartening reality is the black community itself fosters a scary discernment whereby we devalue the life of our own kids. We are not outraged enough. We are not shouting at the top of our lungs demanding exposure or Police attentiveness in finding missing black kids. Time and time again we see large groups of volunteers within the white community, some times in the thousands, searching and looking for their kids. The Black community has failed itself on this issue and we have no one to blame but ourselves. We must began developing respect and admiration for our community, learned to love each other, and look after each others children. In cases where an actual crime has occurred related to missing children, individuals who know something, or has saw something must come forward. We continue to make excuses why we don’t get involved. However, I am not referring to the thug who robbed the local corner store, I am talking about our children, and there can’t possibly be anything of greater importance. When we see crime against our children the entire community must get involved and demonstrate that our kids are sacred ground and any harm unto them will not be tolerated. We must stop living in fear and began to do for our selves what is necessary to protect our children. We know that America is racist, that some people don’t love our people, hate our people, wish death upon our people, and our children. Fear must not be an option when protecting our kids. A movement began last night in an effort to develop a grass roots campaign to help find and locate missing Black Children. The distinguished Host of WBRG “The Bridge” on Blogtalk Radio, Mr. John Robinson and Ms. Corliss King challenged listeners to post images of missing black children on their Facebook Profile page. So starting this Monday or before, I am requesting that all of you (all 20,000 of you) who have been visiting my Blog related to the Phylicia Barnes case, to join in and assist us  launching this movement to get the images of missing black kids out there to the public. You never know what we can achieve by getting the pictures out there in Social Media. Please visit www.blackandmissinginc.com to learn more about missing Black kids. Also post the picture of a missing black child for at least a week and give a brief history of the child’s story. We must do what we certainly can and have to do for ourselves, and save our kids. God Bless each and everyone of you.

The People’s Champion

I’m David Adams

David Adams

Self proclaimed geek, Advocate for the homeless, Social Change, Crime Blogger, and mobile technology enthusiast. Recognized journalist and Human Interest Writer championing the plight of the masses whom are without a voice of their own.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInGoogle Plus

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One Response to “Young Black And Missing: An Anatomy Of Race Hate In America”

  1. Fancy says:

    Great article, I believe we can make a difference. Mr. Adams you should also set up twitter. I follow black and missing and have been retweeting her stories about the missing . Keep up the good work, I hope to join you in the blogging field soon.

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