Remembering Vanessa “Honey” Malone: Slain Georgia Youth 21st Birthday Approaches Without Justice

When the clock strikes twelve midnight this upcoming Sunday February 8, 2015 it will be a very somber time for the Malone family. A time for remembrance and a time for prayer. It will be a prayer that Flora Malone has made constantly over the past few years. A simple prayer that would bring justice for her slain child. It’s the only thing any grieving parent could hope for, that the cowards who shot down their baby girl in the back, and without provocation, would some day be captured and brought before the courts of this civilized land. The family has always hoped that some one would come forward and help solve this brutal cold case murder.

The name Honey, evolved as the hash tag #justiceforhoney resonated coast to coast in America as far west as the state of California, and as far east as Vermont, and abroad. The killing of a hundred pound teen girl who was shot in the back appeared to stir the moral consciousness of people all over the world, who for a moment in time stood in solidarity against the culture of violence, and violence agains young woman in particular. Yet, “Honey’s” killing brought her tragic story international acclaim, while her own hometown of Stone Mountain Georgia continues struggling to obtain any cooperation from the public aiding the police in their efforts to solve this senseless and very heinous crime.

What stands in the way of closure for all who knew and loved this promising young woman, are two very different perspectives about the culture of criminal behavior. While “Honey’s” grieving family are certainly entitled to justice which would include severe penalties for those responsible for her murder, by contrast there are people within our society who are numb to the kind of carnage that plagues the streets of America, and continues to snuff out the lives of young people with females becoming a greater percentage of those who have been tucked away in body bags by the Coroner.

Often times frustration settles in when those who have lost loved ones conclude that cops are inept and aren’t trying diligently enough to find those responsible for violent crimes. In some instances those perceptions have merit, but when we look at the cultural practice of how various communities fail to do their part by providing essential information to help solve crimes, it sends the message that the community where such violence exist, is in fact condoned by the community in it’s entirety. The murder of “Honey” is a case study on how communities fail to help themselves. When our daughters are now being targeted in violent crimes of this nature, it doesn’t take rocket science to conclude that a grass roots effort must be enacted to deter such criminal behavior in our communities. It’s time for the light bulb to go on in communities that traditionally have had high crime activity. The cops are only as effective as the support they get from the community. As much as I hate to admit it, and considering the poor community relations of the police, it’s simply true that they need our help.

We have to change our thinking as it relates to crime, and if the death of Vanessa “Honey” Malone can make any impact on the social development of humanity, it should be that crime on it’s face is an undesirable element in our communities, but the brutalization of young women should not be tolerated under any circumstance whatsoever. Some of the bi-products of crime are those who put pressure on others by labeling anyone who gives cooperation to police as being a “snitch.” Ignorance is bliss, and most people wrongfully apply the term “snitch” related to criminal activity. For example, if a loud noise awakens me in my bed a night and I get up and look out my bedroom window and see two unfamiliar people breaking into my neighbor’s car, and I call the cops on them, that’s not snitching. Am I suppose to just get back in bed and conclude that it’s not my car and none of my business? On the other hand, if I were one of the two people breaking into the car and I was caught by police, but my accomplice got away and I told the cops who he was along with where he lived, then that’s a “snitch”.

It’s usually a ghetto mentality when people have no concern what so ever as to what kind of activities are occurring within their community, especially if they have kids. It’s common sense to want to rid your neighborhood of those who bring it down. The very mentality of people attempting to intimidate others with terms like “snitcher” evokes and identifies those possess cultural incompetence, while also establishing those who may potentially be criminals or who at the very least condone such behavior. Imagine if you lived in an apartment complex that appears to be this clean and peaceful like the image below. Would you want people living there who have a propensity for violence?

Hampvill

It is essentially incomprehensible that the residents of such a community like the Hampton Village Apartments captured above would allow the killing of a young woman in such a brutal fashion and result in no one having ever come forward to give police information. How is it even possible for 4-6 mask gunmen to kick in the door of an apartment in this development and the commotion doesn’t arouse anyone within the entire community? Not only that, but the people who were with “Honey” the night she was killed say that she walked in on a home invasion in progress, became alarmed and tried to flee the apartment. The intruders shot her in the back outside of the apartment, brought her back inside, and nobody heard a thing. That’s a f&^%ing lie, and the cops know it. I am wondering if the cops ever tested for DNA or hair fibers on “Honey” to determine if any trace evidence was transferred from the perpetrator to “Honey” when he brought her back inside. If the crime went down in the fashion that the witnesses have told the story, it’s just hard to imagine that no evidence was ever detected.

The lack of momentum in the Vanessa “Honey” Malone murder speaks volumes about the kind of people who live within the development where the crime occurred. Some say that the rent is very affordable nowadays because crime has driven a volume of families out. People have simply opted for the pursuit of a better life elsewhere, while the streets remain silent on the “Honey” killing. Images of discarded home furnishings thrown about on the grounds and other unfavorable depictions are now more common within the confines of a once very scenic community that has now given way to a culture of crime and violence. So many variables exist as to why her case hasn’t been solved. The more common rationale is that the cops don’t care because it’s yet another violent crime within a predominately black community, and if the people who live there don’t care then why should the police.

Other factors that may be the cause of her case not having been solved may be related to the fact that Malone was biracial, physically attractive, and very popular. “Honey’s” mom Flora Malone previously conveyed to TPC that her daughter was possibly being targeted by her teachers at her school. Malone says she visited the school on several occasions to address issues she believes may have been unfair actions toward her daughter by instructors at “Honey’s” school. The problems at school aren’t believed to have been related to the teens killing, but it offers a closer look at some of the social strife the teen had endured, which also may be a direct result as to why no one has helped the young woman’s family with solving her murder. While some reject that her killing was potentially due to her mixed race, the cops should be looking at every potential angle to establish why anyone would want to harm a popular teen that many say was well liked.

The story about “Honey” having walked in on a home invasion while it was in progress has never made sense, and any logical thinking person would have to conclude that the likelihood of 3 other people (all adults) actually having survived a home invasion encounter with violent thugs of this nature, while the person who posed the least amount of threat to them was murdered is simply unbelievable. The killers were there lying in weight (if you even believe that fishy story) for “Honey”. It’s obvious because they were all masked (according to the survivors), and “Honey” wouldn’t have been able to identify them, so there really was no need to have to kill her if they were concerned that she could finger them. The cowards killed this kid for some unknown reason, and a great place to start looking to find out why is with the three survivors who all miraculously lived to tell this extremely suspicious story.

We’ve been on radio broadcast, televisions, conducted demonstrations, handed out flyers, solicited T-shirts supporting this slain teen, and nothing as worked thus far. After a brief chat with “Honey’s” mom last night, I have to concur with her current posture which she conveyed, “these cowards have gotten away with killing my daughter for too long”. All of us aren’t capable of possessing the unique spirit of compassion or the emphatic ability to even care about the lost life of others, but I implore you all to embrace the reality of a heinous crime like this happening to your child, your sister, your mother, or any female close to you. Would you care then? R.I.P Honey #justiceforhoney

To Be Continued ..

The People’s Champion
I’m David Adams

honey2feat

When the clock strikes twelve midnight this upcoming Sunday February 8, 2015 it will be a very somber time for the Malone family. A time for remembrance and a time for prayer. It will be a prayer that Flora Malone has made constantly over the past few years. A simple prayer that would bring justice for her slain child. It’s the only thing any grieving parent could hope for, that the cowards who shot down their baby girl in the back, and without provocation, would some day be captured and brought before the courts of this civilized land. The family has always hoped that some one would come forward and help solve this brutal cold case murder.

The name Honey, evolved as the hash tag #justiceforhoney resonated coast to coast in America as far west as the state of California, and as far east as Vermont, and abroad. The killing of a hundred pound teen girl who was shot in the back appeared to stir the moral consciousness of people all over the world, who for a moment in time stood in solidarity against the culture of violence, and violence agains young woman in particular. Yet, “Honey’s” killing brought her tragic story international acclaim, while her own hometown of Stone Mountain Georgia continues struggling to obtain any cooperation from the public aiding the police in their efforts to solve this senseless and very heinous crime.

What stands in the way of closure for all who knew and loved this promising young woman, are two very different perspectives about the culture of criminal behavior. While “Honey’s” grieving family are certainly entitled to justice which would include severe penalties for those responsible for her murder, by contrast there are people within our society who are numb to the kind of carnage that plagues the streets of America, and continues to snuff out the lives of young people with females becoming a greater percentage of those who have been tucked away in body bags by the Coroner.

Often times frustration settles in when those who have lost loved ones conclude that cops are inept and aren’t trying diligently enough to find those responsible for violent crimes. In some instances those perceptions have merit, but when we look at the cultural practice of how various communities fail to do their part by providing essential information to help solve crimes, it sends the message that the community where such violence exist, is in fact condoned by the community in it’s entirety. The murder of “Honey” is a case study on how communities fail to help themselves. When our daughters are now being targeted in violent crimes of this nature, it doesn’t take rocket science to conclude that a grass roots effort must be enacted to deter such criminal behavior in our communities. It’s time for the light bulb to go on in communities that traditionally have had high crime activity. The cops are only as effective as the support they get from the community. As much as I hate to admit it, and considering the poor community relations of the police, it’s simply true that they need our help.

We have to change our thinking as it relates to crime, and if the death of Vanessa “Honey” Malone can make any impact on the social development of humanity, it should be that crime on it’s face is an undesirable element in our communities, but the brutalization of young women should not be tolerated under any circumstance whatsoever. Some of the bi-products of crime are those who put pressure on others by labeling anyone who gives cooperation to police as being a “snitch.” Ignorance is bliss, and most people wrongfully apply the term “snitch” related to criminal activity. For example, if a loud noise awakens me in my bed a night and I get up and look out my bedroom window and see two unfamiliar people breaking into my neighbor’s car, and I call the cops on them, that’s not snitching. Am I suppose to just get back in bed and conclude that it’s not my car and none of my business? On the other hand, if I were one of the two people breaking into the car and I was caught by police, but my accomplice got away and I told the cops who he was along with where he lived, then that’s a “snitch”.

It’s usually a ghetto mentality when people have no concern what so ever as to what kind of activities are occurring within their community, especially if they have kids. It’s common sense to want to rid your neighborhood of those who bring it down. The very mentality of people attempting to intimidate others with terms like “snitcher” evokes and identifies those possess cultural incompetence, while also establishing those who may potentially be criminals or who at the very least condone such behavior. Imagine if you lived in an apartment complex that appears to be this clean and peaceful like the image below. Would you want people living there who have a propensity for violence?

Hampvill

It is essentially incomprehensible that the residents of such a community like the Hampton Village Apartments captured above would allow the killing of a young woman in such a brutal fashion and result in no one having ever come forward to give police information. How is it even possible for 4-6 mask gunmen to kick in the door of an apartment in this development and the commotion doesn’t arouse anyone within the entire community? Not only that, but the people who were with “Honey” the night she was killed say that she walked in on a home invasion in progress, became alarmed and tried to flee the apartment. The intruders shot her in the back outside of the apartment, brought her back inside, and nobody heard a thing. That’s a f&^%ing lie, and the cops know it. I am wondering if the cops ever tested for DNA or hair fibers on “Honey” to determine if any trace evidence was transferred from the perpetrator to “Honey” when he brought her back inside. If the crime went down in the fashion that the witnesses have told the story, it’s just hard to imagine that no evidence was ever detected.

The lack of momentum in the Vanessa “Honey” Malone murder speaks volumes about the kind of people who live within the development where the crime occurred. Some say that the rent is very affordable nowadays because crime has driven a volume of families out. People have simply opted for the pursuit of a better life elsewhere, while the streets remain silent on the “Honey” killing. Images of discarded home furnishings thrown about on the grounds and other unfavorable depictions are now more common within the confines of a once very scenic community that has now given way to a culture of crime and violence. So many variables exist as to why her case hasn’t been solved. The more common rationale is that the cops don’t care because it’s yet another violent crime within a predominately black community, and if the people who live there don’t care then why should the police.

Other factors that may be the cause of her case not having been solved may be related to the fact that Malone was biracial, physically attractive, and very popular. “Honey’s” mom Flora Malone previously conveyed to TPC that her daughter was possibly being targeted by her teachers at her school. Malone says she visited the school on several occasions to address issues she believes may have been unfair actions toward her daughter by instructors at “Honey’s” school. The problems at school aren’t believed to have been related to the teens killing, but it offers a closer look at some of the social strife the teen had endured, which also may be a direct result as to why no one has helped the young woman’s family with solving her murder. While some reject that her killing was potentially due to her mixed race, the cops should be looking at every potential angle to establish why anyone would want to harm a popular teen that many say was well liked.

The story about “Honey” having walked in on a home invasion while it was in progress has never made sense, and any logical thinking person would have to conclude that the likelihood of 3 other people (all adults) actually having survived a home invasion encounter with violent thugs of this nature, while the person who posed the least amount of threat to them was murdered is simply unbelievable. The killers were there lying in weight (if you even believe that fishy story) for “Honey”. It’s obvious because they were all masked (according to the survivors), and “Honey” wouldn’t have been able to identify them, so there really was no need to have to kill her if they were concerned that she could finger them. The cowards killed this kid for some unknown reason, and a great place to start looking to find out why is with the three survivors who all miraculously lived to tell this extremely suspicious story.

We’ve been on radio broadcast, televisions, conducted demonstrations, handed out flyers, solicited T-shirts supporting this slain teen, and nothing as worked thus far. After a brief chat with “Honey’s” mom last night, I have to concur with her current posture which she conveyed, “these cowards have gotten away with killing my daughter for too long”. All of us aren’t capable of possessing the unique spirit of compassion or the emphatic ability to even care about the lost life of others, but I implore you all to embrace the reality of a heinous crime like this happening to your child, your sister, your mother, or any female close to you. Would you care then? R.I.P Honey #justiceforhoney

To Be Continued ..

The People’s Champion
I’m David Adams

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