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The Philando Castile Verdict: Police Killings Of Blacks During Routine Traffic Stops Is America’s New Epidemic

 

Their names are compiling as the new martyrs of America’s failing criminal justice system. A system that seems to only produce juries sympathetic to police when they panic, when they make mistakes, and when they kill in the name of their exaggerated and purported fear for their lives while encountering men of color during routine traffic stops.

It seems as if police have carte blanche during their decision making in the slightest appearance of impropriety of a black person stopped by police, and many of these incidents cops manipulate what actually happened, in an effort to conceal misconduct, policy violations, and even criminal acts by police who hold visceral hatred for black people. While police brass continue to argue and propagate the fundamental dangers of policing, the acquittal of Ofc. Geronimo Yanez in the fatal shooting of Philando Castile doesn’t necessarily past the smell test of a cop’s perceived apprehensive fear during a traffic stop.

In considering the rightness of the verdict, pay close attention to the transcript of the fatal encounter:

9:05:00 p.m. — Castile’s vehicle came to a complete stop.

9:05:15 – 9:05:22 p.m. — Yanez approached Castile’s car on the driver’s side.

9:05:22 – 9:05:38 p.m. — Yanez exchanged greetings with Castile and told him of the brake light problem.

9:05:33 p.m. — St. Anthony Police Officer Joseph Kauser, who had arrived as backup, approached Castile’s car on the passenger’s side.

9:05:38 p.m. — Yanez asked for Castile’s driver’s license and proof of insurance.

9:05:48 p.m. — Castile provided Yanez with his proof of insurance card.

9:05:49 – 9:05:52 p.m. — Yanez looked at Castile’s insurance information and then tucked the card in his pocket.

9:05:52 – 9:05:55 p.m. — Castile told Yanez: “Sir, I have to tell you that I do have a firearm on me.” Before Castile completed the sentence, Yanez interrupted and replied, “Okay” and placed his right hand on the holster of his gun.

9:05:55 – 9:06:02 p.m. — Yanez said “Okay, don’t reach for it, then.” Castile responded: “I’m… I’m … [inaudible] reaching…,” before being again interrupted by Yanez, who said “Don’t pull it out.” Castile responded, “I’m not pulling it out,” and Reynolds said, “He’s not pulling it out.”

Yanez screamed: “Don’t pull it out,” and pulled his gun with his right hand. Yanez fired seven shots in the direction of Castile in rapid succession. The seventh shot was fired at 9:06:02 p.m. Kauser did not touch or remove his gun.

9:06:03 – 9:06:04 p.m. — Reynolds yelled, “You just killed my boyfriend!”

9:06:04 – 9:06:05 p.m. — Castile moaned and said, “I wasn’t reaching for it.” These were his last words.

9:06:05 – 9:06:09 p.m. — Reynolds said “He wasn’t reaching for it.” Before she completed her sentence, Yanez screamed “Don’t pull it out!” Reynolds responded. “He wasn’t.” Yanez yelled, “Don’t move! F***!”

If you read carefully, you’ll note that it appears that the officer shot Castile for doing exactly what the officer told him to do. Yanez asked for Castile’s license. Castile told him that he had a gun, and the officer – rather than asking for his carry permit, or asking where the gun was, or asking to see Castile’s hands – just says, “Don’t reach for it then.” The mere presence of a firearm during a traffic stop doesn’t necessarily escalate the danger of the encounter, and the fact that Castile advised officer Yanez that he was armed shows that Castile was being forthright with Yanez and not evasive.

At that point, Castile is operating under two commands. Get his license, and don’t reach for his gun. As Castile reaches for his license (following the officer’s orders), and he assures him that he’s not reaching for the gun (also following the officer’s orders). The entire encounter, he assures Yanez that he’s following Yanez’s instructions. Also, Ofc. Kauser (back up officer) who was positioned on the passenger side of the vehicle was in a better visual vantage to see what Castile was doing with his hands. Kauser never touched his weapon, which should have been an indication that the purported presence of apprehensive fear was nonexistent, at least from that police officer’s vantage.

Despite Castile’s repeated assurances to officer Yanez that he was reaching for his firearm, coupled with Yanez’ poor vantage from the driver’s side, he fires 7 rounds in rapid succession into the vehicle striking Castile. Seated in the driver’s side was Castile’s girlfriend and in the back seat was their small child. Given the stated facts regarding the police encounter that struck down Philando Castile, the jury’s acquittal of Ofc. Yanez isn’t just a complete miscarriage of justice in this case, its simply incredulous that citizens in Minnesota couldn’t hold this officer accountable for his actions. To add insult to injury, Castile was only pulled over for a non functioning break light.

So how did Castile end up Dead? To answer that question, perhaps investigation into why some people become cops may open “Pandora’s Box” regarding the volume of black men being killed by police officers around the country. When you think about it, cops aren’t paid very well, and in most cases officers have to work a volume of overtime to make a decent living. They all can’t be crusaders of justice with ideal moral composes. Recent studies have discovered a volume of white supremacy groups infiltrating police agencies across the country, and the Castile case is just the tip of the ice.

Just a few weeks prior to the Castile verdict, Tulsa Oklahoma officer Betty Shelby was also acquitted for the fatal shooting of an unarmed black man name Terence Crutcher. The circumstances of the Crutcher shooting was even more bizarre than Castile’s. Crutcher whose vehicle broke down on the highway, was approached by Shelby, and Crutcher was captured on surveillance with his hands clearly in the air walking away from Shelby was fatally shot in the back.

Shelby reportedly revealed later on that she was fatigue and hungry during the fatal encounter, and professed to be in fear for her life. Many experts following the case have pointed out that Shelby (a white Officer) may have also suffered from the large black man syndrome that we have seen time and time again, but just like the Castile case, a seated jury acquitted the officer of wrong doing in the fatal incident that struck down the life of an unarmed Black man.

Perhaps breaking down on a highway may be a death sentence to men of color. Back in 2013 former FAMU football player Jonathan Ferrell was fatally shot by police in Charlotte North Carolina, after they responded to a home regarding a possible breaking and entering. Once officers were on the scene, they saw a man fitting the caller’s description of the potential subject who was running towards them. Officers used a stun gun unsuccessfully, and then another officer fired several shots fatally wounding Ferrell.

While police initial facts regarding the case seemed unclear (breaking & entering call), they eventually publicly admitted that Ferrell was probably running to the officers for assistance after having wrecked his car. Charlotte police found a vehicle that had been in a serious accident close to the scene, and believe Ferrell may have simply attempting to seek assistance from the officers. In his case its disturbing that the caller appeared to be a woman who simply didn’t know Ferrell after he knocked on her door also soliciting help from her, as the woman’s home was the closest to where he had crashed his car. A large black man at the door of a white woman some how evolved into police being dispatched for a burglary. This was simply incredible.

Furthermore, if the disturbing pattern of police killing black men hasn’t quite sunk in yet, the case of Samuel Dubose has to grab your attention. Last year a University of Cincinnati police officer (Tensing) fattaly shot Dubose after pulling him over for not having a front license plate. While UC officers have an agreement with the city of Cincinnati which allows them jurisdiction in the surrounding communities just off campus, there had been growing concern regarding UC cops activities of policing off campus in the recent past prior to the Dubose killing.

The shooting was caught on the officer’s body camera and went viral on the internet. Tensing and his partner’s version of the shooting strongly contrasted what was captured on his own body cam. Some of the footage even captured a police supervisor advising Tensing to limit his comment until he speaks with his union representative. In fact, the supervisors comments was probably sound advice, because the police cam footage revealed that the pair of officers had in fact lied in their reports regarding what had actually happened. Tensing file reports claiming that Dubose tried to run him over with his car, but the video footage clearly depicted Tensing at the side of the vehicle when he fired shots into the car fatally wounding Dubose.

These are just a few of the troubling and disturbing cases of police killing black motorist during encounters with police, and while some in America seem to be entangled in deliberations over the guilt or innocence of police in many of these cases, their is no confusion within the black community regarding what’s really happening. There has been a long standing antiquity within racist America that has led to the slaughter of countless black people as an acceptable cultural practice, and what we are experiencing now is simply a reemergence for a propensity to kill black people of epidemic proportions.

“After they are finish with us, they are coming for you. You could be next.”  — Valerie Castile

 

The People’s Champion

I’m Crime Blogger David Adams

 

 

Self proclaimed geek, Advocate for the homeless, Social Change, Crime Blogger, and mobile technology enthusiast. Recognized journalist and Human Interest Writer championing the plight of the masses whom are without a voice of their own.
email

David Adams

Self proclaimed geek, Advocate for the homeless, Social Change, Crime Blogger, and mobile technology enthusiast. Recognized journalist and Human Interest Writer championing the plight of the masses whom are without a voice of their own.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
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Their names are compiling as the new martyrs of America’s failing criminal justice system. A system that seems to only produce juries sympathetic to police when they panic, when they make mistakes, and when they kill in the name of their exaggerated and purported fear for their lives while encountering men of color during routine traffic stops.

It seems as if police have carte blanche during their decision making in the slightest appearance of impropriety of a black person stopped by police, and many of these incidents cops manipulate what actually happened, in an effort to conceal misconduct, policy violations, and even criminal acts by police who hold visceral hatred for black people. While police brass continue to argue and propagate the fundamental dangers of policing, the acquittal of Ofc. Geronimo Yanez in the fatal shooting of Philando Castile doesn’t necessarily past the smell test of a cop’s perceived apprehensive fear during a traffic stop.

In considering the rightness of the verdict, pay close attention to the transcript of the fatal encounter:

9:05:00 p.m. — Castile’s vehicle came to a complete stop.

9:05:15 – 9:05:22 p.m. — Yanez approached Castile’s car on the driver’s side.

9:05:22 – 9:05:38 p.m. — Yanez exchanged greetings with Castile and told him of the brake light problem.

9:05:33 p.m. — St. Anthony Police Officer Joseph Kauser, who had arrived as backup, approached Castile’s car on the passenger’s side.

9:05:38 p.m. — Yanez asked for Castile’s driver’s license and proof of insurance.

9:05:48 p.m. — Castile provided Yanez with his proof of insurance card.

9:05:49 – 9:05:52 p.m. — Yanez looked at Castile’s insurance information and then tucked the card in his pocket.

9:05:52 – 9:05:55 p.m. — Castile told Yanez: “Sir, I have to tell you that I do have a firearm on me.” Before Castile completed the sentence, Yanez interrupted and replied, “Okay” and placed his right hand on the holster of his gun.

9:05:55 – 9:06:02 p.m. — Yanez said “Okay, don’t reach for it, then.” Castile responded: “I’m… I’m … [inaudible] reaching…,” before being again interrupted by Yanez, who said “Don’t pull it out.” Castile responded, “I’m not pulling it out,” and Reynolds said, “He’s not pulling it out.”

Yanez screamed: “Don’t pull it out,” and pulled his gun with his right hand. Yanez fired seven shots in the direction of Castile in rapid succession. The seventh shot was fired at 9:06:02 p.m. Kauser did not touch or remove his gun.

9:06:03 – 9:06:04 p.m. — Reynolds yelled, “You just killed my boyfriend!”

9:06:04 – 9:06:05 p.m. — Castile moaned and said, “I wasn’t reaching for it.” These were his last words.

9:06:05 – 9:06:09 p.m. — Reynolds said “He wasn’t reaching for it.” Before she completed her sentence, Yanez screamed “Don’t pull it out!” Reynolds responded. “He wasn’t.” Yanez yelled, “Don’t move! F***!”

If you read carefully, you’ll note that it appears that the officer shot Castile for doing exactly what the officer told him to do. Yanez asked for Castile’s license. Castile told him that he had a gun, and the officer – rather than asking for his carry permit, or asking where the gun was, or asking to see Castile’s hands – just says, “Don’t reach for it then.” The mere presence of a firearm during a traffic stop doesn’t necessarily escalate the danger of the encounter, and the fact that Castile advised officer Yanez that he was armed shows that Castile was being forthright with Yanez and not evasive.

At that point, Castile is operating under two commands. Get his license, and don’t reach for his gun. As Castile reaches for his license (following the officer’s orders), and he assures him that he’s not reaching for the gun (also following the officer’s orders). The entire encounter, he assures Yanez that he’s following Yanez’s instructions. Also, Ofc. Kauser (back up officer) who was positioned on the passenger side of the vehicle was in a better visual vantage to see what Castile was doing with his hands. Kauser never touched his weapon, which should have been an indication that the purported presence of apprehensive fear was nonexistent, at least from that police officer’s vantage.

Despite Castile’s repeated assurances to officer Yanez that he was reaching for his firearm, coupled with Yanez’ poor vantage from the driver’s side, he fires 7 rounds in rapid succession into the vehicle striking Castile. Seated in the driver’s side was Castile’s girlfriend and in the back seat was their small child. Given the stated facts regarding the police encounter that struck down Philando Castile, the jury’s acquittal of Ofc. Yanez isn’t just a complete miscarriage of justice in this case, its simply incredulous that citizens in Minnesota couldn’t hold this officer accountable for his actions. To add insult to injury, Castile was only pulled over for a non functioning break light.

So how did Castile end up Dead? To answer that question, perhaps investigation into why some people become cops may open “Pandora’s Box” regarding the volume of black men being killed by police officers around the country. When you think about it, cops aren’t paid very well, and in most cases officers have to work a volume of overtime to make a decent living. They all can’t be crusaders of justice with ideal moral composes. Recent studies have discovered a volume of white supremacy groups infiltrating police agencies across the country, and the Castile case is just the tip of the ice.

Just a few weeks prior to the Castile verdict, Tulsa Oklahoma officer Betty Shelby was also acquitted for the fatal shooting of an unarmed black man name Terence Crutcher. The circumstances of the Crutcher shooting was even more bizarre than Castile’s. Crutcher whose vehicle broke down on the highway, was approached by Shelby, and Crutcher was captured on surveillance with his hands clearly in the air walking away from Shelby was fatally shot in the back.

Shelby reportedly revealed later on that she was fatigue and hungry during the fatal encounter, and professed to be in fear for her life. Many experts following the case have pointed out that Shelby (a white Officer) may have also suffered from the large black man syndrome that we have seen time and time again, but just like the Castile case, a seated jury acquitted the officer of wrong doing in the fatal incident that struck down the life of an unarmed Black man.

Perhaps breaking down on a highway may be a death sentence to men of color. Back in 2013 former FAMU football player Jonathan Ferrell was fatally shot by police in Charlotte North Carolina, after they responded to a home regarding a possible breaking and entering. Once officers were on the scene, they saw a man fitting the caller’s description of the potential subject who was running towards them. Officers used a stun gun unsuccessfully, and then another officer fired several shots fatally wounding Ferrell.

While police initial facts regarding the case seemed unclear (breaking & entering call), they eventually publicly admitted that Ferrell was probably running to the officers for assistance after having wrecked his car. Charlotte police found a vehicle that had been in a serious accident close to the scene, and believe Ferrell may have simply attempting to seek assistance from the officers. In his case its disturbing that the caller appeared to be a woman who simply didn’t know Ferrell after he knocked on her door also soliciting help from her, as the woman’s home was the closest to where he had crashed his car. A large black man at the door of a white woman some how evolved into police being dispatched for a burglary. This was simply incredible.

Furthermore, if the disturbing pattern of police killing black men hasn’t quite sunk in yet, the case of Samuel Dubose has to grab your attention. Last year a University of Cincinnati police officer (Tensing) fattaly shot Dubose after pulling him over for not having a front license plate. While UC officers have an agreement with the city of Cincinnati which allows them jurisdiction in the surrounding communities just off campus, there had been growing concern regarding UC cops activities of policing off campus in the recent past prior to the Dubose killing.

The shooting was caught on the officer’s body camera and went viral on the internet. Tensing and his partner’s version of the shooting strongly contrasted what was captured on his own body cam. Some of the footage even captured a police supervisor advising Tensing to limit his comment until he speaks with his union representative. In fact, the supervisors comments was probably sound advice, because the police cam footage revealed that the pair of officers had in fact lied in their reports regarding what had actually happened. Tensing file reports claiming that Dubose tried to run him over with his car, but the video footage clearly depicted Tensing at the side of the vehicle when he fired shots into the car fatally wounding Dubose.

These are just a few of the troubling and disturbing cases of police killing black motorist during encounters with police, and while some in America seem to be entangled in deliberations over the guilt or innocence of police in many of these cases, their is no confusion within the black community regarding what’s really happening. There has been a long standing antiquity within racist America that has led to the slaughter of countless black people as an acceptable cultural practice, and what we are experiencing now is simply a reemergence for a propensity to kill black people of epidemic proportions.

“After they are finish with us, they are coming for you. You could be next.”  — Valerie Castile

 

The People’s Champion

I’m Crime Blogger David Adams

 

 

Self proclaimed geek, Advocate for the homeless, Social Change, Crime Blogger, and mobile technology enthusiast. Recognized journalist and Human Interest Writer championing the plight of the masses whom are without a voice of their own.
email

David Adams

Self proclaimed geek, Advocate for the homeless, Social Change, Crime Blogger, and mobile technology enthusiast. Recognized journalist and Human Interest Writer championing the plight of the masses whom are without a voice of their own.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInGoogle Plus

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