Baltimore’s March For Peace: TPC’s Hometown Under Siege By Gun Violence With 37 Shot In 7 Days

It was a hot and muggy summer afternoon in West Baltimore yesterday as a group of demonstrators marched down North Avenue crying out to it’s fellow citizens to stop the violence. The demography of the crowd was of mix race, as white people strolled along side blacks, and people of other ethnicity. There was none of the obvious divide between race, social class, nor education that typically has strapped down this city’ growth for decades, a town more well known for being a place where the killing of young people. is the order of the day, and a cultural way of life. Grandmothers with young children walked holding hands and politicians as well as local Clergy finally began to make their presence known in a desperate attempt to end the killing of Baltimore’s sons and daughters. My commentary is quite difficult for me to compose while tears reveal the impassioned, gut wrenching, and heartfelt empathy for the city’s struggles, and the communities that many of our youth are born into. Baltimore City is my hometown, my birthplace, and where I also once had to navigate the mean, tough, and murderously violent streets. In a week’s time 37 people were shot in Baltimore, killing 15 of them, and sparking a citywide protest to bring an end to the senseless violence that continues to plague the entire town. The sudden spike in violence has caused Mayor Stephanie Rawlings Blake to seek unconventional methods to add more police presence on the streets. State Police, Transit Police, and even Sheriff Deputies will be apart of a task force to bolster police presence in many of the hotspots in Baltimore that are known for gun violence, but is that enough? I think the mayor’ promptu efforts is nothing more than a bandaid for a problem which has long since spiraled out of control. Baltimore has serious financial and economic woes that have been ignored from as far back to the administration of it’s beloved, and late leader William Donald Scheafer. The educational system is in shambles with elementary school kids seen playing on the filthy trash thrown streets of the city during school hours. There is no secret about the lack of education for Baltimore’s youth and the lack of state funding needed to rehabilitate it’s public schools. It’s simply a sign of the modern day social class struggles that existed when I attended school in Baltimore during my youth. Coupled with the city government’ inability to properly educate it’s young people, there is also a stagnant job market that has only afforded economic development to corporate enterprises, like the Johns Hopkins conglomerate, and other business developers who have been successful in brokering back door deals with city politicians lining their pockets with personal profits. While the people of Baltimore are left holding the bag through their tax dollars, a well organized system of pay for play holds the town hostage, and allows the criminal justice system to become the main source of commerce in a violent city which resembles other troubled American towns across the nation. In Baltimore the Medical Industry and Division of Corrections have ballooned into the largest industrial profit for the city. The availability for citizens to find work to support their poor families is limited, while corporate brokers and other big businesses extract the market resources out of the town and never invest in the city’ financial and economic growth. However, the seemingly endless open air market for drugs and guns remain a prevalent alternative source of revenue for the poor, hustling, and desperate people of Baltimore, who see nothing more than remedial industry service jobs as insufficient employment to aid the sustainability of their families. The problem reaches far beyond a culture of uneducated, ignorant, and violent thugs who terrorize the city. The problem is systemic because of the absence of a middle class that long fled the city in search of a better quality of life. Baltimore’s epidemic of violence has long been fueled by a predominate community base that ranks at the very apex of illiteracy in the country, and is home to the largest community of uneducate African-Americans in the nation. To address the violence in Baltimore and other troubled cities just like her around the country, a grassroots effort by the very society mostly impacted by crime and street violence, must be born, and an awakening by people of color related to black on black violence has to be the starship to end the oppression of our people in this post civil rights era.  There is no easy solution to violence in the black community, but a good place to start is reeducating or youth along the lines of personal value systems, and the indoctrination of other cultural experiences that would allow many of our youth to adapt to communities and activities other than the day to day routine that many of them experience the duration of their entire development. We have to start some place, our youth is the best place to begin, because I am not convinced that city governments lack the resources for economic, and financial growth to create jobs, and other community base services which offer educational and recreational development for young people so they can stay out of trouble. The system appears to be designed to aid in the expedient failure of black youth and black people as a whole. We simply have to wake up and realize that we are an enemy of this land that our ancestors built, and that the killing of black babies at the hands of black people, simply plays into the hands of the powers that be like a well written script. Pray for our children who face perhaps the greatest challenges than any other generation before their time. Stop the violence!!

 

 

The People’s Champion

I’m David Adams

David Adams

Self proclaimed geek, Advocate for the homeless, Social Change, Crime Blogger, and mobile technology enthusiast. Recognized journalist and Human Interest Writer championing the plight of the masses whom are without a voice of their own.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInGoogle Plus

It was a hot and muggy summer afternoon in West Baltimore yesterday as a group of demonstrators marched down North Avenue crying out to it’s fellow citizens to stop the violence. The demography of the crowd was of mix race, as white people strolled along side blacks, and people of other ethnicity. There was none of the obvious divide between race, social class, nor education that typically has strapped down this city’ growth for decades, a town more well known for being a place where the killing of young people. is the order of the day, and a cultural way of life. Grandmothers with young children walked holding hands and politicians as well as local Clergy finally began to make their presence known in a desperate attempt to end the killing of Baltimore’s sons and daughters. My commentary is quite difficult for me to compose while tears reveal the impassioned, gut wrenching, and heartfelt empathy for the city’s struggles, and the communities that many of our youth are born into. Baltimore City is my hometown, my birthplace, and where I also once had to navigate the mean, tough, and murderously violent streets. In a week’s time 37 people were shot in Baltimore, killing 15 of them, and sparking a citywide protest to bring an end to the senseless violence that continues to plague the entire town. The sudden spike in violence has caused Mayor Stephanie Rawlings Blake to seek unconventional methods to add more police presence on the streets. State Police, Transit Police, and even Sheriff Deputies will be apart of a task force to bolster police presence in many of the hotspots in Baltimore that are known for gun violence, but is that enough? I think the mayor’ promptu efforts is nothing more than a bandaid for a problem which has long since spiraled out of control. Baltimore has serious financial and economic woes that have been ignored from as far back to the administration of it’s beloved, and late leader William Donald Scheafer. The educational system is in shambles with elementary school kids seen playing on the filthy trash thrown streets of the city during school hours. There is no secret about the lack of education for Baltimore’s youth and the lack of state funding needed to rehabilitate it’s public schools. It’s simply a sign of the modern day social class struggles that existed when I attended school in Baltimore during my youth. Coupled with the city government’ inability to properly educate it’s young people, there is also a stagnant job market that has only afforded economic development to corporate enterprises, like the Johns Hopkins conglomerate, and other business developers who have been successful in brokering back door deals with city politicians lining their pockets with personal profits. While the people of Baltimore are left holding the bag through their tax dollars, a well organized system of pay for play holds the town hostage, and allows the criminal justice system to become the main source of commerce in a violent city which resembles other troubled American towns across the nation. In Baltimore the Medical Industry and Division of Corrections have ballooned into the largest industrial profit for the city. The availability for citizens to find work to support their poor families is limited, while corporate brokers and other big businesses extract the market resources out of the town and never invest in the city’ financial and economic growth. However, the seemingly endless open air market for drugs and guns remain a prevalent alternative source of revenue for the poor, hustling, and desperate people of Baltimore, who see nothing more than remedial industry service jobs as insufficient employment to aid the sustainability of their families. The problem reaches far beyond a culture of uneducated, ignorant, and violent thugs who terrorize the city. The problem is systemic because of the absence of a middle class that long fled the city in search of a better quality of life. Baltimore’s epidemic of violence has long been fueled by a predominate community base that ranks at the very apex of illiteracy in the country, and is home to the largest community of uneducate African-Americans in the nation. To address the violence in Baltimore and other troubled cities just like her around the country, a grassroots effort by the very society mostly impacted by crime and street violence, must be born, and an awakening by people of color related to black on black violence has to be the starship to end the oppression of our people in this post civil rights era.  There is no easy solution to violence in the black community, but a good place to start is reeducating or youth along the lines of personal value systems, and the indoctrination of other cultural experiences that would allow many of our youth to adapt to communities and activities other than the day to day routine that many of them experience the duration of their entire development. We have to start some place, our youth is the best place to begin, because I am not convinced that city governments lack the resources for economic, and financial growth to create jobs, and other community base services which offer educational and recreational development for young people so they can stay out of trouble. The system appears to be designed to aid in the expedient failure of black youth and black people as a whole. We simply have to wake up and realize that we are an enemy of this land that our ancestors built, and that the killing of black babies at the hands of black people, simply plays into the hands of the powers that be like a well written script. Pray for our children who face perhaps the greatest challenges than any other generation before their time. Stop the violence!!

 

 

The People’s Champion

I’m David Adams

David Adams

Self proclaimed geek, Advocate for the homeless, Social Change, Crime Blogger, and mobile technology enthusiast. Recognized journalist and Human Interest Writer championing the plight of the masses whom are without a voice of their own.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInGoogle Plus

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